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Harvard and Mt Sinai researchers Warn Us About Toxins

You heard it here first (but only if you don’t subscribe to The Atlantic. I’m under the impression they’re kind of a big deal).

Scientists, specifically medical school deans and professors at Harvard and Mt Sinai, are sounding the alarm about the chemicals we breathe, touch, eat, and drink, which they say cause “not just lower IQ’s, but ADHD and autism spectrum disorder.”

Just in case that slipped by you, HARVARD AND MOUNT SINAI EXPERTS SAY REDUCING TOXIC LOAD IS ESSENTIAL TO BUILDING A FUNCTIONAL BRAIN AND NERVOUS SYSTEM.

Not woo woo. Science.

Of note:

Landrigan has the credentials of some superhero vigilante Doctor America: a Harvard-educated pediatrician, a decorated retired captain of the U.S. Naval Reserve, and a leading physician-advocate for children’s health as it relates to the environment.

Their new study is similar to a review the two researchers published in 2006, in the same journal, identifying six developmental neurotoxins. Only now they describe twice the danger: The number of chemicals that they deemed to be developmental neurotoxins had doubled over the past seven years. Six had become 12. Their sense of urgency now approached panic. “Our very great concern,” Grandjean and Landrigan wrote, “is that children worldwide are being exposed to unrecognized toxic chemicals that are silently eroding intelligence, disrupting behaviors, truncating future achievements and damaging societies.”

Oh, and

In perhaps their most salient paragraph, the researchers say that genetic factors account for no more than 30 to 40 percent of all cases of brain development disorders:

‘Thus, non-genetic, environmental exposures are involved in causation, in some cases probably by interacting with genetically inherited predispositions. Strong evidence exists that industrial chemicals widely disseminated in the environment are important contributors to what we have called the global, silent pandemic of neurodevelopmental toxicity.’

Silent pandemic. When public health experts use that phrase—a relative and subjective one, to be deployed with discretion—they mean for it to echo.

Read the whole article here. In case you missed that first link. I really want you to read this article.

Thanks, science!

Bonnie